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10 Grade English Language Arts4th Nine Weeks Curriculum GuideWeek 7 and 8Suggested Pacing: 7-10 Day Lesson (50 minutes or 90 minutes block sessions)Essential Question(s)1. Think of effective leaders—either public figures or people whom you know. Whatqualities do they have in common?2. What makes a person persuasive?3. What can we learn about characters from their speech and other character’s speech?4. What insights into human nature can we gain by reading Shakespeare?CCRS Standards: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text saysexplicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.9-10.1] Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over thecourse of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details;provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.9-10.2] Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations)develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot ordevelop the theme. [RL.9-10.3] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, includingfigurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific wordchoices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; howit sets a formal or informal tone). [RL.9-10.4] Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literaturefrom outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g.,how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later authordraws on a play by Shakespeare).Learning Objectives: Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the drama Julius CaesarStudents will gain knowledge and understanding of the elements of drama and poetryStudents will gain an appreciation for the life and works of Williams ShakespeareThis curriculum guide is designed to support teachers in the implementation of the Alabama Course of Study Standards. You are encouraged to usethis document to support your planning and daily instructional practices. It is not a substitution for lesson plans.

Vocabulary: What key terms will students need to know to understand?Key Vocabulary Apparition- n. ghost Chastisement-n. punishment or reprimand Disconsolate – adj. without cheer, hope or comfort Misconstrue – v. to mistaken the meaning of, misinterpret Repose- n. relaxation, rest Tarry –v. to remain in place, stay Tidings- n. news, informationAcademic tionPlayConflictTragedyDramaLeaderTragic heroFriendAssessment Plan: How will I assess prior knowledge? How will I know students mastered thestandard? (Formative, Summative, Other Evidence):Formative assessment suggestions include but are not limited to the following: Student annotations Student completed dialectical journals Self, peer, and teacher edits Paragraph and essay revision Timed writings on prompts for literature passages not previously discussed or read in class Checks of completed NMSI TEACHER TRAINING/LTF TEACHER TRAINING/LTF lessons Multiple choice practice Group discussion and participation Literary Circles Graphic Organizers Quickwrite Think Pair Share Socratic Seminar Journal Reflections 3-2-1Summative assessment suggestions include but are not limited to the following: Final drafts of paragraphs and essays RAFTThis curriculum guide is designed to support teachers in the implementation of the Alabama Course of Study Standards. You are encouraged to usethis document to support your planning and daily instructional practices. It is not a substitution for lesson plans.

Timed Annotation of literary work not previously discussed or read in class Unit tests on individual literary works that explore students' application of objectiveknowledge; this assessment type should not be limited strictly to the students' abilities torecall objective informationLearning Activities:Pre-ReadingQuick Write Can serious conflict ever be resolved without bloodshed? What are some of the ways inwhich warring factions can end conflict? Discuss: Lead class discussion: Discuss ways in which the conflict between Anthony andBrutus might be resolved. Then, arriving at a consensus, make a prediction as to how youthink the play might end. Explain to students to read to find out how civil conflict ends in Julius Caesar ends. How to read a play (review and discuss helpful hints)Vocabulary Review:o Students will be provided with a vocabulary sheet which includes the terms, part ofspeech, and definition.During Reading(Day 1-4): Students will read and annotate Act IV and V. Begin to read Act IV and V. Ask probing questions to make sure students understand whatis going on in the story. Student will read and annotate the texts for the rhetorical strategies diction, Repetition,Dialect, Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Syntax, Diction, Allusion, and Rhetorical Question Students will complete a dialectical journal while reading and annotating text. Students will respond to discussion questions. If needed, teacher may provide students with a character chart to help the students keepwith the various characters they will encounter and their specific role in the play.After Lesson:The following questions can be used in a variety of ways. Assigned to each student or to smallgroups, the questions can be used as formal study guides, class discussion starters, writingassignments, a review for a test, etc.This curriculum guide is designed to support teachers in the implementation of the Alabama Course of Study Standards. You are encouraged to usethis document to support your planning and daily instructional practices. It is not a substitution for lesson plans.

ACT IV, SCENE I.1. What are Antony, Octavius, and Lepidus doing at the opening of the scene?2. Why do they want Caesar's will? What is ironic about this?3. What is Antony's plan for Lepidus? What is his reason?ACT IV, SCENE II.4. What does Brutus tell Lucilius about dying love?5. What practical instructions does Brutus give Cassius about their disagreement? What is unusual aboutthis?ACT IV, SCENE III.6. What wrong does Cassius say Brutus has done him?7. In response, what does Brutus condemn Cassius for doing?8. What does Cassius threaten to do if Brutus continues to “urge” him?9. According to Brutus, how has Cassius wronged him? What is ironic about Brutus's accusation?10. To prove that he has been wronged, what does Cassius tell Brutus to do to him?11. What is the real reason for Brutus's ill temper? Give all of the details.12. Messala brings what ill news of the triumvirate's actions in Rome?13. What reasons does Cassius give for not going directly to Philippi?14. What reasons does Brutus give for going directly to Philippi? Who prevails?15. What happens to make Brutus speed up his plans to go to Philippi?ACT V, SCENE I.16. What hope of Octavius and Antony is answered? What does this say about Brutus?17. What does Cassius mean by the following statement?“Flatterers! Now, Brutus, thank yourself;/This tongue had not offended so today,/If Cassius might haveruled.”(45-47)18. What ominous sign has Cassius seen that causes him to fear the coming battle?19. What does Brutus say he will do if they lose the battle? Why is he reluctant to do this?ACT V, SCENE III.20. What horrible mistake does Cassius make? What is the outcome of this mistake?21. What is Titinius's reaction to Cassius's actions?22. What is Brutus's response to Cassius's and Titinius's actions?ACT V, SCENE IV.23. What role does Lucilius take upon himself? What was Antony's response to his masquerade?ACT V, SCENE V.24. What request does Brutus make of Clitus? What is his response?This curriculum guide is designed to support teachers in the implementation of the Alabama Course of Study Standards. You are encouraged to usethis document to support your planning and daily instructional practices. It is not a substitution for lesson plans.

25. What does Brutus ask Volumnius to do? What reasons does he give? What is Volumnius's response?26. What does Strato do for Brutus? What does Strato ask Brutus to do first? Why?27. What overture of peace does Octavius make to Brutus's men?28. How do Antony and Octavius honor Brutus?Writing Options:Write a Review of Julius Caesar: Write a review of Julius Caesar, discussing the play’s strengths andweaknesses. How well did Shakespeare organize his plot? Are the characters vivid and believable?Is the dialogue interesting? Support your analysis with quotations from the play and references tospecific scenes.Persuasive Letter: Knowing all you now know about Roman history, you are being transportedback in time to the day of Caesar's assassination. Your assignment is to write an anonymous letterto the conspirators in which you persuade them not to carry out their plans.Extension Activity (options): Show a film version of Julius Caesar after you have completed reading the play in class. Havestudents evaluate the movie and compare/contrast it with the text. Have a Roman Empire day in your class. Have students dress up in Roman costumes, play musicfrom the period, decorate your room as a Roman banquet hall, and have students each bringsomething for a meal of the time. Have students plan a trip to Italy. They should research the cost of the trip, places to go and visit,accommodations and meals; everything they would need to actually make the trip. Studentscould write about things they would most like to see in Italy. You could have them write adescriptive essay as if they had taken the trip. You could get creative writing about theadventures they had in their travels.Lifelong Learning (Research Paper):Research Equality Issues: Much progress has been made for equality between the sexes since thelate 1800s, but there are still areas of inequality in modern life. With a partner, research an area ofgender inequality, such as differences in pay, women’s sports, or career advancement.OR Teacher-Approved TopicStudent and teachers should continue to revise and edit the students 1st draft of their researchpaper.Materials:This curriculum guide is designed to support teachers in the implementation of the Alabama Course of Study Standards. You are encouraged to usethis document to support your planning and daily instructional practices. It is not a substitution for lesson plans.

Julius n/Accommodations: Re-Teaching Small Group Instruction Scaffolding Instruction Tiered Instruction Explicit Vocabulary Instruction Reading along with audio CD Differentiated projects Note-taking Graphic OrganizersTechnology Integration: YouTube Power notes CD (Holt McDougal) Promethean Board/flipcharts Edmodo.com Schoolrack.com Criterion.ets.orgTeacher Notes:The teacher should pace the lesson according to his/her allotted time and schedule.Please ensure that you have a copy of the play Julius Caesar because it is not included in ourtextbook. Parallel text or modern versions are acceptable. Teachers should choose the versionwhich best fits the needs of their students.Because reading Shakespeare can be difficult at any grade-level, it is suggested that the studentsemploy a variety of reading strategies: active reading, annotation, role play, and audio versions.The teacher should read some parts pausing for clarity and questions.Teachers should use the Holt, Rhinehart and Winston (Literature textbook) and Writer’s Choice(Grammar and Writing Textbooks) as main resourcesThis curriculum guide is designed to support teachers in the implementation of the Alabama Course of Study Standards. You are encouraged to usethis document to support your planning and daily instructional practices. It is not a substitution for lesson plans.

The teacher should utilize formative assessments throughout the lesson to direct instructionThe teacher should use before literacy strategies to : activate prior knowledge, preview the textskimming and scanning, set a purpose for reading and make predictionsThe teacher should use during literacy strategies to: maintain an active interaction with the text,identify, analyze and construct the main idea, determine important ideas, draw conclusions, makeinferences, monitor understanding, generate questions, and summarizeThe teacher should use after literacy strategies to: determine main idea, draw conclusions, makeinferences, monitor understanding through formative assessments, generate questions and buildschemataThis curriculum guide is designed to support teachers in the implementation of the Alabama Course of Study Standards. You are encouraged to usethis document to support your planning and daily instructional practices. It is not a substitution for lesson plans.

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