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JULY 11-12, 2019UTAH VALLEY UNIVERS ITYOREM, UTAH

“PLANTING SEEDS,STRENGTHENING ROOTS”AT U TA H VA L L E Y U N I V E R S I TYUVU students and Native community youth share cultural dancing during aspecial halftime performance at the UVU Basketball home opener duringNative American Heritage Month in November.Utah Valley University (UVU) has an open admission policy welcomingany student with a high school diploma or equivalent. Our NativeAmerican Initiative is committed to community partnerships, whichenhance academic opportunities for Indian communities and tribalmembers. Offering three bachelor degrees and a minor, we preparestudents to meet professional goals and tribal leadership needs: Indian Affairs Administration emphasis in the Political Science BA or BS degreeprepares students for graduate programs in Public Administration, PublicHealth, Business Administration, or Law. American Indian Studies emphasis, Integrated Studies, empowers studentsto “integrate” with other fields such as Hospitality Management, Social Work,Education, etc. American Indian Studies minor allows students to complement their chosenfield with a career focus or general interest in Native American culture.800 W. University ParkwayOrem, Utah 84058Program DirectorNative American InitiativeKen ademic AdvisorNative American SpecialistJustin [email protected]

American Express Logo.pdf17/1/1910:16 AMCMYCMMYCYCMYKThe American Express Center for CommunityDevelopment (CCD) is committed to addressing theeconomic challenges facing Utah’s low- and moderateincome communities. In partnership with governmentagencies, non-profit organizations, the CCD helpsprovide housing, economic development and communityrevitalization through lending, investments, educationaltraining and technical assistance.

S U M M I T M A P - A D U LT T R AC KSorensen CenterLEVEL 1LEVEL 24

W E LCOM EWelcome to the 14th Annual Governor’s Native American Summit. This importantevent continues to serve as the premier gathering for everyone interested in helpingUtah’s Native communities thrive. The continued success of the summit reflectsGovernor Gary R. Herbert’s dedication to ongoing engagement and strengthenedrelationships with the state’s eight sovereign tribes.This year’s Summit is built around the theme, “Planting Seeds, Strengthening Roots”,which reflects our desire as Native people to embrace progress without sacrificingimportant traditions where we find strength. Planting seeds is symbolic of sharingcultural knowledge and wisdom with the next generation to strengthen our roots andconnection for future generations. The paths to the future include footsteps of the past.These paths include education, family, career, and community, with each pathreflecting individuality while remaining anchored by important traditions. Many of thesessions this year will focus on educational and economic progress, but there are alsosessions devoted to strengthening family relationships and celebrating Native culture.As with past years, Native youth will have their own sessions to help them as theybegin their own journey. These sessions will provide strategies for healthy living,reinforce the importance of education, and encourage a healthy respect for family andelders. These youth will determine the future for their tribes and play an important rolein the state’s success, and the Youth Track will help to shape them as future leaders.The Governor’s Native American Summit continues to attract hundreds of attendees,multiple sponsors, and a variety of vendors and exhibitors. Without your support andparticipation, this summit would not be a success. We hope you find it useful and thankyou for joining us.Shirlee SilversmithDirectorI n d i a n A ffa i r sJill Remington LoveExecutive DirectorD e pa rt m e n t o f H e r i tag e & A rt sAstrid S. TuminezI n t e r i m Pre s i d e n tU ta h Va l l e y U n i v e r s i t y5

State o f UtahOff ic e o f t h e Gov ernorSa lt La ke C it y, Utah8 4 1 1 4 -2 2 2 0Welcome to the 14th Native American Summit, hosted by the Utah Division of IndianAffairs. This year’s theme, “Planting Seeds, Strengthening Roots,” emphasizes theimportance of growth and progress without sacrificing the cultural traditions ofAmerican Indians in Utah.The Native American Summit has remained important to me since its launch in 2005because it provides an opportunity to collectively build a brighter path for the future. Asgovernor, I want to ensure we provide the opportunities and support for that growth.One of our major state initiatives is 25K Jobs, which aims to create 25,000 new jobs inour 25 rural counties by 2020. Many of these rural counties include tribal lands, wherethe seeds we plant today through education, infrastructure, and job training will yieldmore robust economies and improved quality of life. We can strengthen the roots inthese communities through the partnerships we nurture with your tribal governmentsand other organizations that support American Indians throughout the state.This summit provides significant opportunities, and I hope every attendee takesadvantage of the connections and resources you will find here. Connect with other triballeaders, engage the nonprofits and companies that work with native populations,and most importantly, talk to the many state agency liaisons that can help addressspecific issues.Of course, the future will be shaped by the next generations. That is why I am pleased toonce again see a Youth Summit scheduled. This is an important investment in the futureleaders of our sovereign tribes as well as the state as a whole.Thank you for adding your perspectives and insights into these important conversations.Together, we can develop solutions to the challenges that impact the lives of NativeAmericans and strengthen the Native American families and communities in Utah.Gary R. HerbertGovernor6Spencer J. CoxLieutenant Governor

U TA H G OV E R N O RGovernor Gary R. Herbert has led Utah’s recoveryfrom the Great Recession to a position of nationaleconomic prominence. His unwavering focus oneconomic development includes attracting businessesand investment to the state while helping homegrownbusinesses flourish. The Governor is focused on fourcornerstones to strengthen Utah’s economy: education,jobs, energy and self-determination. As a result, Utah hasbecome a premier destination for business, jobs, and anunsurpassed quality of life.As Utah’s 17th Governor, he took the Oath of Office on August 11, 2009. Priorto becoming the states’ chief executive, Governor Herbert served as LieutenantGovernor for five years. In 1990, Governor Herbert was appointed to the Utah CountyCommission and concluded his service there in 2004.Governor Herbert and his wife, Jeanette, are the proud parents of six children and 16grandchildren.T E R RY C RO SSDAY 1Terry (Ha-ne-ga-noh), an enrolled member of theSeneca Nation, received his master’s degree in socialwork from Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.He is the founding executive director of NICWA, nowserving as senior advisor. He is the author of PositiveIndian Parenting and co-authored Towards a CulturallyCompetent System of Care,published by GeorgetownUniversity. He has 40 years of experience in childwelfare, including 10 years direct practice.R H O N DA “ H O N E Y“ D U VA L LYO U T HDAY 2Rhonda “Honey” DuVall is an independent R&B artist,with a mix of Hip Hop and Soul. Her style of music tendsto open one’s eyes to a different perspective and givesthe listener a chance to unwind in the simplicity of wordsand thought. Some say, “She tells a message,” Otherssay, “She speaks of real life experiences,” Honey says, “Ispeak on how the world approaches me.”7

N I K K I B O RC H A R DT CA M P B E L LDAY 2Nikki holds a JD degree and a Certificate in IndianLaw from Arizona State University College of Law.Nikki also holds a B.A. and M.A. in Cultural and SocialAnthropology from Stanford University where shegraduated with honors. As an Attorney, Nikki has workedwith all aspects of Indian law as well as civil litigation.Nikki’s current work entails strengthening and enhancingtribal judicial systems, including developing trainingand technical assistance for tribal judicial personnel,attorneys, and other organizations.Ms. Campbell also serves on the Board of Directorsfor the Partnership for Native Children (PNC), a nonprofit started by a group of motivated women from across Indian Country who wereincreasingly concerned with the intense media coverage of the Indian Child WelfareAct (ICWA) and accompanying legal cases. She has also served on the Arizona StateUniversity Indian Legal Program Advisory Council since September 2018.Ms. Campbell is married to Matthew Campbell (Y’upik) who is a staff attorney at theNative American Rights Fund, and she is the mother to Eli and Eloise.AG E N DAThursday July 11, 201987:00 AMVendor Set-Up7:30 AMRegistration, Exhibits & Continental Breakfast8:20 AMDrum Call: Buffalo Nation8:30-10:30 AMPlenary Session Welcome: Shirlee Silversmith, Director, UDIA Spiritual Prayer: Patrick Charles Presentation of Colors: Utah Inter-Tribal VeteransAssociation & Students - Arnold Leno National Anthem & Pledge of Allegiance: GisselleGarcia and Carson Deschene Welcome from UVU: Ken Sekaquaptewa (IntroduceRecorded Message) Welcome from UTL Chairman: Shaun Chapoose, UteIndian Tribe Host Tribe Welcome: Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah:Tamra Borchardt - Slayton Paiute Tribe Overview: Video

AG E N DAThursday July 11, 20198:30-10:30 AMPlenary Session (Continued) Cultural Performance: Bird Singing and Dancing Keynote Presenter: Terry Cross Introduction of Governor Herbert: Jill Love Gubernatorial Address: Gary R. Herbert, Governor Cultural Performance Instructions & Adjourn: Shirlee Silversmith,Director, UDIA10:45 AM-12:00 PMBreakout Session 112:00–12:50 PMLunch: Grand Ballroom1:00-2:15 PMBreakout Session 22:15-2:30 PMBreakFriday July 12, 20197:30-8:20 AMRegistration, Breakfast, Exhibitors8:30-10:20 AMPlenary Session Welcome: Shirlee Silversmith, Director, UDIA Spiritual Prayer: Travis Parashonts Keynote Presenter: Nikki Brochardt-Campbell Cultural Performance: Round Dance Panel Discussion: Moderator: Spencer J. CoxLieutenant Governor, State of UtahPanelists: Valentina R Sireech, CEO, Ute TribalEnterprises, LLC; Rupert Steele, Chairman,Confederated Tribes of Goshute; James Singer; LarryEcho Hawk; Nikki Brochardt-Campbell Intructions & Adjourn: Shirlee Silversmith, Director,UDIA10:45-12:00 PMBreakout Session 412:00-12:50 PMLunch: Grand Ballroom9

B R E A KO U T S E SS I O N S OV E RV I E WSESSION 1 THURSDAY, 10:45 AM-12:00 PMOpioids: Education, Harm Reduction and Recovery Services206 G/HPatrick Rezac, Jeremy Taylor, Ryan Ward; A collaborative presentation from One Voice RecoveryInc., Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake and the Utah Department of Health. Cover a wide rangeof topics related to otpioids in Utah, from prevention, education, harm reduction and recoveryservices.Child WelfareTerry Cross.206 AGrant Writing 101206 BJaNee Livingston; This is a beginners guide to grant writing. We will cover the various types ofgrants available and how the process works.Volunteerism/Americorps206 CMike Moon; This session will focus on the AmeriCorps grant process in Utah and how tribescan access the funding application to increase programming and/or outreach. Through smallgroup work, participants will be guided through a process of brainstorming the structure of anAmeriCorps program for their own tribe.Cultural Make n Take: Making a Medicine Bag213 A,BDiane Murphy; Each student who attends the class will receive supplies to make their ownmedicine bag. As we go along, I will explain the meaning to them about why they are called’medicine bag’ or ‘pouch’.Indigenous Films Screening:Ragan TheatreFilm Screening: Warrior WomenWarrior Women is the story of Madonna Thunder Hawk, one such AIM leader who shapeda kindred group of activists’ children - including her daughter Marcy - into the “We WillRemember” Survival School as a Native alternative to government-run education.Elder Lounge214SESSION 2 THURSDAY, 1:00-2:15 PMPublic Safety206 G/HJennifer McNair, Kris Hamlet, Chris Caras, Carrie Silcox, Major Steve Winward; AnnaBoynton will moderate; Learn about different Divisions within the Utah Department of PublicSafety. Representatives from the Utah Highway Patrol, Division of Emergency Management,Driver License Division, Highway Safety Office, and Crime Lab will give a brief overview andanswer questions.Community, Culture and Identity: Utilizing Traditional Values to Prevent Suicide206 AKristina Groves, Nino Reyos, April Yazzie; Improving Native Americans’ mental health maytake many paths, including mental health therapy, social and traditional activities, eating welland exercising and being involved in spiritual traditions. Wellness means we value life, knowwhere we come from, what it means to be Native and how to help our relations.Native American Education in Urban Schools, Changing the Narrative206 BMeredith Schramm; Many times in schools we teach about ‘how’ Native Americans lived.This workshop will focus on how to bring that history more current and look at ways we canaccurately represent the culture today. We will look at lesson plans and resources that areavailable to use in our classrooms.Traditional and Today: Modern Diets and Physical ActivityKristie Hinton, Gay Pinnecoose; How to bring tradition into a modern Native lifestyle.206 CCultural Make n Take: Making a Medicine Bag213 A,BDiane Murphy; Each student who attends the class will receive supplies to make their ownmedicine bag. As we go along, I will explain the meaning to them about why they are called’medicine bag’ or ‘pouch’.10

Meaningful Consultations With Tribal GovernmentsCentre StageDustin Jansen; Aimed at Federal, State, and Tribal Government employees or elected officials.This course focuses on developing positive communication and cooperation to enhance thegovernment-to-government relationship.Elder Lounge214SESSION 3 THURSDAY, 2:30-3:45 PMBuild a Better Business: Best practices for entrepreneurs206 G/HPete RobinsonThere is a common myth that 80% of businesses fail in the first 5 years. The truth is, there arecertain things businesses can do to dramatically increase their chances of succeeding. Thispresentation will discuss some of the most important practices for entrepreneursImportance of 2020 Census and How to Ensure a Complete Count206 ACandace Bear; The 2020 Census is almost upon us. Candace will give an overview of itsimportance and how the 2020 Census impacts tribes.KUED Book Club in a Box: Opening Minds through Storytelling & Dialogue206 BLaura Durham and John Howe; KUED’s Book Club in a Box invites book club hosts to leaddiscussions based on content provided through a novel paired with a documentary. Learnhow this program is shifting perspectives and cultivating compassion. KUED will introduce itsnewest box exploring the history of Native American boarding schools and the importance ofheritage and home.Demystifying the Indian Child Welfare Act’s Placement Preferences206 CStephanie Benally, Alisa A. Lee; This presentation will cover an in depth discussion of theIndian Child Welfare Act’s (ICWA) Placement Preferences. There are many misunderstoodaspects of ICWA especially Tribal participation, the wishes of parents and state law. We willdiscuss the law, federal regulations and tribal state agreements.Cultural Make n Take: Making a Medicine Bag213 A,BDiane Murphy; Each student who attends the class will receive supplies to make their ownmedicine bag. As we go along, I will explain the meaning to them about why they are called’medicine bag’ or ‘pouch’.Murdered and Missing Indigenous RelativesCentre StageMoroni Benally, Yoland Francisco-Nez; This presentation will focus understanding the scopeof Murdered and Missing Indigenous Relatives crisis in Utah. The data infrastructure (i.e.collecting, tracking, and monitoring) on MMIR will be the emphasis.Health Concerns for Native Families in the 21st CenturyRagan TheatreEruera “Ed” Napia; How do you think past and present life experiences challenge yourhealth and your family’s health? Join in an interactive/conversational presentation in whichwe will discuss what brings ourselves and our families into our current health and wellnesspredicaments.Elder Lounge214FRIDAY 11

SESSION 4 FRIDAY, 10:45 AM-12:00 PMReturn to the Red Circle206 BDamon Polk; In this interactive session participants will have an opportunity to engage inculture expression and open lines to communicate, interact and express.Heads on Fire206 ARobert Adolpho; A practical solution for restoring sacred centers: a proactive approach toeconomic development, based upon cooperation and common core values. The emphasis willbe upon turning a cupping hand away from government dependence and towards the heaventhrough knowledge.Restoring Family Unity206 G/HAlbert Pooley; This workshop shows a model overview of training fathers to be leaderswith the support of mothers to strengthen their families in their own home. With five coreprinciples of the Creator, Choice, being Teachable, Wisdom and Service, fathers and motherslearn the importance of caring for their families.Research and Cancer in Indian Country Today206 CNathan Begaye, Joshua Bleicher, MD, Phyllis Nassi; Have you participated in research? Howmuch do you know about research? Do you know what an IRB is? Do you know what clinicaltrials are? How do we move forward?Cultural Make n Take: Making a Medicine Bag213 A,BDiane Murphy; Each student who attends the class will receive supplies to make their ownmedicine bag. As we go along, I will explain the meaning to them about why they are called’medicine bag’ or ‘pouch’.Indigenous Films ScreeningRegan TheatreFilm Screening: What Was Ours. What Was Ours is a film that touches on the lives of threeindividuals from the Wind River Indian Reservation and their journey to The Field Museum inChicago, Illinois.Elder Lounge12214

S U M M I T M A P - YO U T H T R AC KScience BuildingLEVEL 1171176175LEVEL 227613

YO U T H T R AC K AG E N DAThursday, July 11, 2019147:30-8:20 AMRegistration, Breakfast, Exhibitors8:20-8:30 AMDrum Call: Buffalo Nation8:30-10:30 AMPlenary Session Welcome: Shirlee Silversmith, Director, UDIA Spiritual Prayer: Patrick Charles Presentation of Colors: Utah Inter-Tribal VeteransAssociation & Students - Arnold Leno National Anthem & Pledge of Allegiance: GisselleGarcia and Carson Deschene Welcome from UVU: Ken Sekaquaptewa (IntroduceRecorded Message) Welcome from UTL Chairman: Shaun Chapoose, UteIndian Tribe Host Tribe Welcome: Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah:Tamra Borchardt - Slayton Paiute Tribe Overview: Video Cultural Performance: Bird Singing and Dancing Keynote Presenter: Terry Cross Introduction of Governor Herbert: Jill Love Gubernatorial Address: Gary R. Herbert, Governor Cultural Performance Instructions & Adjourn: Shirlee Silversmith,Director, UDIA10:45-12:00 AMBreakout Session 112:00–12:50 PMLunch: Grand Ballroom1:00-2:15 PMBreakout Sessions 22:15-2:30 PMBreak & Exhibits2:30-3:45 PMBreakout Sessions 33:50-4:10 PMYouth Prize Giveaway: Grand Ballroom5:00-6:00 PMDinner: Court Yard / Ballroom6:10-7:00 PMCultural Performance UVU: Reagan Theatre

YO U T H T R AC K AG E N DAFriday, July 12, 20197:30-8:20 AMRegistration, Breakfast, Exhibitors8:30-8:35 AMWelcome: Ken Sekaquaptewa8:35-9:15 AMKeynote Presenter: Rhonda Duvall9:20 AM-9:25 AMDismiss: Ken Sekaquaptewa9:35-10:35 AMBreakout Session 410:45-11:45 AMBreakout Session 512:00-12:50 PMLunch: Grand Ballroom15

YO U T H B R E A KO U T S ESS I O N SOV E RV I E WSESSION 1 THURSDAY, 10:45 AM-12:00 PMExpress Yourself (Red)175Michael Gross; The importance and benefits of expressing yourself through traditional andnon-traditional art forms.Digital Storytelling with an Indigenous Lens (Yellow)171Sahar Khadjenoury; Have you ever watched a video and thought, “Natives should do that!”?This is your creative voice speaking to you. Turn your ideas into video content and share themwith the world with equipment you might already have. Find out what it takes to become yourown video media creator.Exhibitors (Blue)CommonsVisit with the colleges and exhibitors, fill out provided card and enter the drawing to win prizes.SESSION 2 THURSDAY, 1:00-2:15 PMExpress Yourself (Blue)175Michael Gross; The importance and benefits of expressing yourself through traditional andnon-traditional art forms.Digital Storytelling with an Indigenous Lens (Red)171Sahar Khadjenoury; Have you ever watched a video and thought, “Natives should do that!”?This is your creative voice speaking to you. Turn your ideas into video content and share themwith the world with equipment you might already have. Find out what it takes to become yourown video media creator.Exhibitors (Yellow)CommonsVisit with the colleges and exhibitors, fill out provided card and enter the drawing to win prizes.SESSION 3 THURSDAY, 2:30-3:45 PMExpress Yourself (Yellow)175Michael Gross; The importance and benefits of expressing yourself through traditional andnon-traditional art forms.Digital Storytelling with an Indigenous Lens (Blue)171Sahar Khadjenoury; Have you ever watched a video and thought, “Natives should do that!”?This is your creative voice speaking to you. Turn your ideas into video content and share themwith the world with equipment you might already have. Find out what it takes to become yourown video media creator.Exhibitors (Red)CommonsVisit with the colleges and exhibitors, fill out provided card and enter the drawing to win prizes.SESSION 4 (YOUTH CHOOSE) FRIDAY, 9:35-10:35 AMMedicine and Health Science175Scott Willie; A panel of AI/AN Science and Health Science students will share theirperspectives on higher education and careers in Medicine and Health Science – particularly asthey pertain to the struggles in the classroom, home, and cultural values.Growth and Defense - Molts and Shells176Paul Dunn; Come and learn about the many different types of molts and shells found in bothland and sea animals. We will examine molts, chills and lie mammals to see how differentanimals grow and how they use these structures to defend themselves.Be Ready SchoolsJeff Johnson16171

Making Lip Balm275Donna Eldridge; Sahar Khadjenoury; Long before moisturizers or cosmetic products werepurchased at stores, Indigenous peoples created their own products with minerals, oils andplants harvested from earth. In this workshop participants will learn about various kindsof natural ingredients, including oils, butters and waxes. Participants will mix their owningredients with the essential oils provided and take home their own lip balm and healing bar.SESSION 5 (YOUTH CHOOSE) FRIDAY, 10:45-11:45 AMMedicine and Health Science175Scott Willie; A panel of AI/AN Science and Health Science students will share theirperspectives on higher education and careers in Medicine and Health Science – particularly asthey pertain to the struggles in the classroom, home, and cultural values.Growth and Defense - Molts and Shells176Paul Dunn; Come and learn about the many different types of molts and shells found in bothland and sea animals. We will examine molts, chills and lie mammals to see how differentanimals grow and how they use these structures to defend themselves.Be Ready Schools171Jeff JohnsonHow to keep yourself and your school safe in today’s world of natural disasters, man-madeproblems and violent incidents. Come learn about preparedness and safety measures for youand your school.Making Lip Balm275Donna Eldridge; Sahar Khadjenoury; Long before moisturizers or cosmetic products werepurchased at stores, Indigenous peoples created their own products with minerals, oils andplants harvested from earth. In this workshop participants will learn about various kindsof natural ingredients, including oils, butters and waxes. Participants will mix their owningredients with the essential oils provided and take home their own lip balm and healing bar.17

TRIBAL LEADERSHIPCO N F E D E R AT E D T R I B E SOF GOSHUTES K U L L VA L L E Y BA N DOF GOSHUTEPA I U T E I N D I A N T R I B EO F U TA HRupert SteeleChairmanCandace BearChairwomanTamra Borchardt-SlaytonChairperson407 Skull Valley RoadSkull Valley, UT 84029440 North Paiute Dr.Cedar City, UT 84721Phone: 435-831-4079Fax: [email protected]: 435-586-1112Fax: [email protected] AVA J O N AT I O NUTE INDIAN TRIBE OF THEUINTAH & OURAY RESERVATIONHC 61 Box 6104195 Tribal Center RoadIbapah, Utah 84034Phone: 435-234-1138Fax: [email protected] N J UA N S O U T H E R NPA I U T E T R I B ECarlene YellowhairPresidentP.O. Box 2950Tuba City, UT 86045Jonathan NezPresident100 ParkwayP.O. Box 7440Window Rock, Arizona 86515Phone: 928-871-7000Phone: 928-212-9794Fax: [email protected] O RT H W E ST E R N BA N DO F S H O S H O N E N AT I O NDarren ParryChairman707 North Main StreetBrigham City, UT 84302Phone: 435-734-2286Fax: [email protected] T E MO U N TA I N U T E T R I B EHarold CuthairChairmanP.O. Box JJTowaoc, CO 81334Phone: 970-564-5606Fax: [email protected] DuncanChairmanP.O. Box 190Fort Duchesne, UT 84026-0190Phone: 435-722-5141Fax: [email protected]

T H E PA I U T E I N D I A N T R I B E O FU TA H LO G O M E A N I N GThe Tribal seal was adopted by Tribal Resolution97-20 on May 13, 1997 and signed into law by TribalChairwoman Geneal Anderson. The design wasdone with the sacred colors, White; purity, light andmourning, Red; power and protection Yellow; healing,strength, life Black; strength and power. The seal is usedon the floor of the Tribal gymnasium and is incorporatedinto the Tribe’s headquarters in Cedar City, Utah.The Tribal seal is a ring of two lines; on it an eagle, symbolic of the deity, flies infront of the map of Utah. In the southwestern corner an arrowhead pinpoints theTribe’s location (the Paiutes are known for their arrowheads). To the left of theeagle is a pair of gourd rattles which represents the Paiute’s traditional Salt Songand Bird Songs. To the right is a hand drum which represents the traditionalCircle Dance songs and the Hand Game songs. At the base of the map are three“Hand Game” sticks. The object of the “Hand Game” is a guessing game, and ispopular for intertribal or local competition in which the Paiutes have a reputationamong surrounding tribes for their hand game skills, and still played to this day.The Tribal seal was designed by Paiute Tribal member Travis N. Parashonts at therequest of the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Tribal Council.Hanging from the seal, making it resemble a warrior’s shield, are five decoratedeagle feathers which represents the five constituent Paiute Bands of the PaiuteIndian Tribe of Utah. Arching above the top is the official name “Paiute IndianTribe of Utah”. Inside the shield, below the “Hand Game” sticks, is “FederallyRecognized April; 3, 1980”, showing the paramount importance of Restorationto the Tribe.19

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Give a child an educationand you give him.yy Solutiobi l i tnsoMEment Possweribioplitmki l lpe S s ResourHoceswww.americanindianservices.orgmise DistincProtionAMERICAN INDIAN SERVICESScholarships and Educational Programs for Native AmericansAt the Urban Indian Center of Salt LakePromotesCultural EnrichmentEducation SuccessHealthy LifestylesPositive Peer RelationshipsCommercial Tobacco andSubstance Abuse PreventionFor further information call 801-214-7658 or visit the UICSL website at www.uicsl.org21

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) is proud to be partnering with the Governor’s American IndianSummit. We believe Utah should be a place where all people can enjoy the best health possible. In partnershipwith the Office of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Health Affairs and the Utah Indian HealthAdvisory Board (UIHAB), our goal is to improve health outcomes for AI’s/AN’sliving on & off the reservations in Utah.Collaborative efforts currently include:22Art by S. Pete Medicaid Expansion Enrollment Opioid Crisis & Response Planning Immunizations Obesity/Diabetes Public Health Data Sharing & Reporting Emergency Preparedness & Training Maternal Child Health (MCH) Health/Public Health Policy Mosquito AbatementFor more information visit: health.utah.gov & health.utah.gov/indianh

Help keep Utah safe.DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETYREPORTSUSPICIOUSACTIVITYSEESAYsomethingwhen S-SAFE(833-377-7233)Huntsman Cancer Institute’sCenter for HOPE bringscommunities and researcherstogether to find ways ofpreventing cancer inunderserved populations.Our goal is to eliminate healthinequities in cancer and chronicdiseases in the Mountain West.huntsmancancer.org/hope23

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UTAH DIV ISIO N O F IN DIA N A FFA I R S250 N O RT H 1950 W E ST, SU ITE ASA LT L A K E CITY, U T 84116IN DIA N .U TA H .G OV

UVU students and Native community youth share cultural dancing during a . Seneca Nation, received his master’s degree in social work from Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. He is t